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Back to articles Coping with Colic by Dr. Joey Schulman

Categories: Parenting


Unfortunately, approximately 20-30% of all newborns develop symptoms of colic, making the first few months quite overwhelming and tense. The good news is that there are natural and nutritional changes that may help to ease parents thru this stressful period.

 

The arrival of your new baby is one of the most exciting yet exhausting times. From middle of the night feedings to frequent diaper changes, new parents are constantly on the go. Unfortunately, approximately 20-30% of all newborns develop symptoms of colic, making the first few months quite overwhelming and tense. The good news is that there are natural and nutritional changes that may help to ease parents thru this stressful period.

 

 

Colic is typically diagnosed by your medical doctor and is described as long periods of unexplained and inconsolable crying that lasts longer than 3 hours at a time. Although doctors do not know the underlying causes of colic, there is thought to be a digestive link. Colicky symptoms typically begin at approximately 3 weeks of age and can continue until your baby is 3-4 months old.  


Exciting new research conducted by David Hill, Director of the Department of Allergy at Royal Children’s Hospital in Australia, points to the fact that nutritional changes may help to ease colic symptoms in breast fed infants. Seventy percent of breast fed babies cried 20 percent less within one week after their mothers cut out cow’s milk, wheat, eggs, nuts, soy and fish from their diets. It is recommended that breast-feeding mothers eliminate all of the suspected food irritants for a two week period and then to re-introduce one at a time to pinpoint the culprit.

 

In addition to altering your diet for a period of time to help ease colicky symptoms, parents should also consult with their doctors to ensure their infants are growing and thriving normally. It is also important for parents to take a break from the trying situation of a colicky baby by leaning on outside supports such as grandparents, a caretaker or friends. Allowing others to take a “shift” with your baby will give you the necessary time to catch up on some much needed relaxation and sleep, and will, in turn, help you cope much better with this temporary situation.

 

References:

Hill, D. Pediatrics, Nov 2005; 116: e709 - e715.

 

 

Reprinted with permission from Sweetpea Baby Food  www.sweetpeababyfood.com

 




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